Macabre Manifesto

“The Conservative manifesto features commitments to make CCTV mandatory in slaughterhouses, reform pet vending rules and to address live exports alongside their pledge to hold a vote on the repeal of the Hunting Act.” http://www.onekind.scot/onekindblog/article/how_is_animal_welfare_treated_in_in_the_ge2017_manifestos

When Conservatives address crowds of live exports, what will they speak about? Voting for Christmas?

Tough on crime: no more vending the rules. If you pay for an animal, you’re entitled to watch its death being dispensed.

Peak pesticide

“By comparing similar farms using high or low levels of pesticides, the scientists found that 94% of farms would lose no production if they cut pesticides and two-fifths of these would actually produce more. …
A recent consultancy report commissioned by the ECPA [European Crop Protection Association] indicated that French farmers would lose €2bn of grape production without access to certain pesticides.” https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/apr/06/farms-could-slash-pesticide-use-without-losses-research-reveals

The agrochemical industry insists it’s all or nothing with their pesticides; they won’t have farmers cherry-picking.

CanineTB

“Defra says that bTB in dogs is not a notifiable disease, but an outbreak of this size in [hunting] dogs that work across farmland must surely now be taken seriously. Just how many other packs are infected?
And of course hound-to-cattle bTB transmission, perhaps via hound excrement left in fields pastured by cattle, is entirely plausible – a fact that concerned farmers are waking up to. Hound excrement may even be infecting badgers with bTB.” http://www.theecologist.org/News/news_analysis/2988743/bovine_tb_found_in_foxhounds_and_nothing_to_do_with_badgers_now_what.html

Defra reminded the public that the purpose of the badger culling programme is to eradicate badgers. Reports of bovine TB infecting others species are just a distraction.

Grain Belch

In producing loaves of bread, “ammonium nitrate fertiliser alone accounts for 43% of all the greenhouse gas emissions, dwarfing all other processes in the supply chain including baking and milling. These emissions arise from the large amounts of energy and natural gas needed to produce fertiliser, and from the nitrous oxide released when it is degraded in the soil. …
The agriculture industry’s primary purpose is to make money, not to provide sustainable food for the whole world. Profits for farmers and retailers rely on highly productive crops – which require lots of relatively cheap fertiliser. However the environmental impact of this fertiliser is not costed within the system and so there are currently no real incentives to fix things.” https://theconversation.com/weve-calculated-the-environmental-cost-of-a-loaf-of-bread-and-what-to-do-about-it-73643

Gluten is not the only gas-causing culprit.

Get your food without fertilisers through Ethical Superstore – 20% off Fairtrade ends today.

EUtrophic

“At least 16 of the 100 largest pay-outs under the [EU Common Agricultural Policy] single payment scheme last year went to entities owned or run by people featured in the Sunday Times Rich List …
Other recipients in the Top 100 include wealthy foreign owners …
A spokesperson for the Earl of Moray said: ‘All our payments are received for land in hand and actively farmed by our business. As for the vast majority of farmers in the UK CAP support is an important part of our income and helps deliver the intended public policy objectives of maintaining food production, social fabric and environmental standards in rural areas.'” (http://energydesk.greenpeace.org/2016/09/29/common-agricultural-policy-millions-eu-subsidies-go-richest-landowners/)

Social fabric? That would be the wool you’re trying to pull over our eyes.

Golden Reyes

“That experience includes the endless promises and the repeated failures of the one ‘healthier’ GM crop that has been in development for nearly 20 years, Golden Rice, with enhanced Vitamin A levels. This was promised as an immediate cause for blindness in the late 1990s, but is still not working.” (https://www.soilassociation.org/news/2016/may/new-study-highlights-the-failure-of-an-ageing-gm-technology/)

It’s hard to see why.

Chattels

“Livestock subsidies in the 34 OECD nations alone were $53bn in 2013, including an average of $190 per cow.” (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/nov/24/meat-tax-far-less-unpalatable-than-government-thinks-research-finds)

Greenhouse gas methane, loss of carbon sink forests, farming subsidy, pollution remediation, animal abuse, antibiotics, food poisoning, health care… You don’t get so much meat per pound these days.