Cosmetic App

“The [genetically modified] apples are identical to their conventional counterparts except the flesh of the fruit will retain a fresh appearance after it is sliced or bruised.” (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/feb/14/canadian-companys-genetically-modified-apples-win-us-approval)

Who has an appetite for covering up the bruises of fruit abuse?

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Genetican

“A lack of consumer acceptance killed the last genetically modified potato. Monsanto introduced it in 1995 and quietly canned it in 2001.” (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/nov/08/innate-potato-simplot-gm-watchdogs)

There should be more noise about sneaky canned GM vegetables!

Mustle

“Corporate food and agriculture interests put $36 million into anti-[GM]-labeling campaigns in the two [US] states. … Backers of labeling mustered only $8 million in Oregon and $895,000 in Colorado to campaign for passage.” (http://uk.reuters.com/article/2014/11/05/us-usa-elections-gmo-idUKKBN0IP2I920141105)

Genetically modified mustard labels don’t cut it.

Rubiscuit

“Some have estimated that tinkering with Rubisco [the enzyme responsible for converting carbon dioxide into sugar] and ways to boost the concentration of carbon dioxide around it could generate up to a 60% increase in the yields of crops such as rice and wheat.” (http://www.nature.com/news/hacked-photosynthesis-could-boost-crop-yields-1.15949)

Tinkering: the watchword of genetic modification.

Graze

“Brachiaria grasses have been found to inhibit the release of nitrous oxide [largely from livestock production], which has a more powerful [climate] warming effect than carbon dioxide or methane … [However] the extra productivity could provide an additional economic incentive for the clearance of forests and – as with all monocultures – the proposed expansion of brachiaria pastureland poses a challenge to biodiversity.” (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/sep/17/grass-agriculture-emissions-scientists)

Whatever, so long as we can keep eating our horseburgers.

Weed

“Making weedy rice more competitive could exacerbate the problems it causes for farmers” as well as threatening genetic diversity. (http://www.nature.com/news/genetically-modified-crops-pass-benefits-to-weeds-1.13517)

Gene pool unwittingly drained by agrochemical meddlers intending only to pull the plug on indentured clients.