Canny

“AG Barr, the maker of Irn Bru, warned that “the scope for fraud in a Scottish DRS [deposit return scheme] is huge. On a small scale we could see people scavenging in bins for containers, as is the US experience. On a medium scale there is the potential for local authority amenity centre looting. And on a larger scale there is the very real possibility of cross-border trafficking of deposit-bearing containers. It costs around £400 to move a lorry load of cans from England to Scotland. A single lorry could carry 160,000 crushed cans or £32,000 worth of deposits.”” https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/sep/05/scotland-planning-deposit-return-scheme-for-bottles-and-cans

And on a massive scale, there’s combining the health hazards of refined sugar, carbonic and citric acids, artificial flavourings, preservatives and colours, and rust into a multimillion pound business.

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Love Litter

“A spokesman for [SEPA] said: ‘Our officers are comfortable that there is no environmental risk to the River Cree as a result of the bottles being released and, following inquiries, understand almost all of the bottles were contained and removed from the river fairly quickly by local residents.’ …
‘It was never my intent to harm the environment. It was more accident, naivety as well as stupidity in the execution. … It was just my intention to send a wee love bottle with a message to someone I had not yet met.'” http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-south-scotland-40738484

100s litres fuel, 2000 bottles, 1 4G-enabled motorhome, 50 dates – priceless.

Recola

“A Coca Cola spokesperson said: ‘We support recovery and recycling of our packaging and we want to help find ways to ensure that less of it is littered and ends up in the sea. Whilst we support and participate in deposit schemes in some countries, in some cases we have believed a different approach could be more effective and more sustainable than DRS [Deposit Return Scheme] – and in the UK we have raised some concerns about the impact of a DRS scheme on household recycling rates.'” http://www.theecologist.org/News/news_analysis/2988601/exposed_coca_colas_big_fight_back_against_tackling_plastic_waste.html

Business models based on maximising the sale of one-use items will want us to forget the second part of the equation:
Reduction in household recycling of plastic bottles = bad
Converting recycling to the neglected other two Rs – Reducing and Reusing = good

Repackaging

“By 2030, EU states would have had to recycle 70% of their municipal waste, 80% of product packaging, 60% of plastic packaging, 60% of plastics, 80% of wood and 90% of ferrous metals, aluminium and glass.
But the package was withdrawn by the incoming EU president, Jean-Claude Juncker, after industry protests. The backlash that provoked from environmentalists led Juncker’s deputy, Frans Timmermans, to promise a revised proposal that would be “broader, more ambitious [and] more effective”.” (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/nov/20/eu-drops-food-waste-marine-litter-reduction-targets-leak-reveals)

The package itself needed 80% recycling.

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Litterny

“In rural Kent, a farmer reported last week that he had lost a contract worth £16,000 after broken glass, probably hurled into a field from a passing car, was found in his oat harvest; prams, fridges and carpets were dumped on a quiet road in Dover; and hedgerows around Appleby, near Scunthorpe in Lincolnshire, were found to be thick with rubbish. In four years, residents have voluntarily collected more than 2,400 sackfuls of fast food and other rubbish dumped in nearby lanes.” (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/may/30/litter-rubbish-keep-britain-tidy)

As national austerity is set to continue, who can afford to waste reusable items, let alone pay extra for one-use packaging? Like the hedgerows, some folk are ‘thick with rubbish’.

Keep thick books out of rubbish: http://www.betterworldbooks.com/ | http://www.betterworldbooks.co.uk/

Subwaste

“Items including a washing machine, tumble drier, a WWII mine and a curling stone have been removed from Scottish waters over the past ten years. … 800 tonnes of litter is the equivalent of two full Olympic swimming pools.” (http://news.scotland.gov.uk/News/800-tonnes-of-litter-removed-from-seas-17c0.aspx)

The children’s swimming certification process may be setting too harsh targets for ‘retrieving an underwater object’.

Help keep books out of the waste stream with http://www.betterworldbooks.com/ or http://www.betterworldbooks.co.uk/

Bang

“California’s first-in-the-nation state ban on single-use plastic grocery bags … has triggered a harsh reaction from plastic bag manufacturers. … ‘You just take it back to the grocery store and stuff it into a container and it gets recycled,’ said Jon Berrier, a spokesman for the American Progressive Bag Alliance, which is funding the effort to repeal the ban.” (http://uk.reuters.com/article/2014/12/30/us-usa-california-bags-idUKKBN0K81KT20141230)

A berrier for progress?