Hare Today

“From 1954 to 1999 the mountain hare population on moorland sites decreased by nearly 5% every year, which ecologists attributed to the planting of conifer forests on former grouse moors. But from 1999 to 2017 the scale of the moorland declines increased dramatically to over 30% every year, leading to counts in 2017 of less than 1% of original levels in 1954.

David Noble, chairman of the Game and Wildlife Conservation Trust in Scotland, said data gathered by the GWCT over the same period as the study does not suggest such a decline in hare numbers on grouse moors.
“…we look forward to reviewing it, especially how the counts were made, because assessing hare numbers accurately is challenging.”” https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/aug/14/scotlands-mountain-hare-population-severe-decline

Especially when you’re lucky to see even one.

“Whilst hares can benefit from the intensive management intended for grouse (hare declines were lowest on grouse moors up to 1999) this is only when they are not being culled.” http://ww2.rspb.org.uk/community/ourwork/b/scotland/archive/2018/08/14/catastrophic-declines-of-mountain-hares-what-rspb-scotland-believes-should-happen-next.aspx

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Hare-brained

“The Scottish Gamekeepers Association even warn that: ‘… The over-grazing damage was caused solely by mountain hares.'” https://www.onekind.scot/killing-mountain-hares-is-not-conservation/

The lack of native vegetation can in no way be attributed to (a) plagues of red grouse or (b) regular torching with accelerants.

Hare-brains

“Several of the companies which offer the opportunity to kill Scottish hares also offer hunting trips in various African countries, such as Zimbabwe” https://www.onekind.scot/is-one-of-those-hares-named-cecil/

‘Scottish hares’ offered for hunting in Zimbabwe may be in breach of Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) legislation.

Hare Cut

“Mountain hares are now routinely culled on a large scale on many grouse moors in Scotland. This practice has developed relatively recently in the belief that it protects red grouse against the tick-borne louping ill virus, despite the lack of scientific evidence to support this claim.” (http://scottishwildlifetrust.org.uk/article/scottish-wildlife-organisations-call-to-ban-mountain-hare-cull/)

Head keeper grouses about hare loss.