Hare Today

“From 1954 to 1999 the mountain hare population on moorland sites decreased by nearly 5% every year, which ecologists attributed to the planting of conifer forests on former grouse moors. But from 1999 to 2017 the scale of the moorland declines increased dramatically to over 30% every year, leading to counts in 2017 of less than 1% of original levels in 1954.

David Noble, chairman of the Game and Wildlife Conservation Trust in Scotland, said data gathered by the GWCT over the same period as the study does not suggest such a decline in hare numbers on grouse moors.
“…we look forward to reviewing it, especially how the counts were made, because assessing hare numbers accurately is challenging.”” https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/aug/14/scotlands-mountain-hare-population-severe-decline

Especially when you’re lucky to see even one.

“Whilst hares can benefit from the intensive management intended for grouse (hare declines were lowest on grouse moors up to 1999) this is only when they are not being culled.” http://ww2.rspb.org.uk/community/ourwork/b/scotland/archive/2018/08/14/catastrophic-declines-of-mountain-hares-what-rspb-scotland-believes-should-happen-next.aspx

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Herring Guile

“The publication follows a similar one released by Aberdeenshire Council in January this year and outlines methods to reduce conflict between people and roof-nesting gulls.” (http://www.rspb.org.uk/media/releases/405493-rspb-scotland-welcomes-new-gull-guide)

The earlier release had been welcomed by gulls, who in turn released their own guide to liberating fast food and retaking prominent latrine sites such as monuments.

Mickey Maui’s

New Zealand’s “Maui’s dolphin population now stands at between 42 and 47 individuals. … Strikingly marked, with a dark, rounded dorsal fin that has been likened to a Mickey Mouse ear, … at the present rate, the dolphins may be extinct in 14 years. … The New Zealand government [is] beginning development of a five-year research plan for the species rather than taking immediate conservation action.” (http://news.mongabay.com/2015/0605-kessler-mauis-dolphin-decline.html)

Preparation, development and authorisation of the five-year research plan is expected to take nine years.

Falcohol

“The owner of Kestrel Lager supports the RSPB in its efforts to identify the causes of the kestrel population decline.” (http://www.rspb.org.uk/media/releases/382325-scotlands-kestrels-in-severe-decline)

No-one is implicating the lager, by the way – kestrels don’t drink it – but the fewer kestrels going about, the less kestrel juice and then EC directives mean it has to be rebranded.