Dodgehog

“In [London’s] Regents Park … [hedgehogs] appear to have learnt to keep clear of the busy roads that are one of the main causes of their decline. … Hedgehogs pinpointed during the survey were found to walk up to 1.5km each night while foraging for slugs, beetles and other invertebrates. … [Researchers] also plan to carry out DNA tests which could reveal if animal-lovers have illicitly released hedgehogs into the park.” (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/jun/02/last-hedgehogs-in-central-london-survived-by-learning-to-avoid-roads)

That hedgehog is never illegal,
Nor has DNA from a beagle;
Just a penchant for slugs,
And beetles and bugs,
And cunning defence against seagulls.

But what is it doing in Regents,
Isolated from its legions?
Avoiding the roads,
Say the electrodes,
It’s baffling all the high heidjins.

The scientists track the moving point,
And analyse max point and min point,
But all they can find,
From fingers and spines,
Is hedgehogs are tricky to pinpoint.

‘Mon the hedgehogs!

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Driving Mad

“Habitat loss and illegal hunting are leading drivers behind mammal population decline and extinction in the tropical forests of Southeast Asia. But what’s driving these drivers? Road infrastructure.” (http://news.mongabay.com/2015/0320-gfrn-mark-southeast-asia-roads-devastating-wildlife.html)

It’s clear that roads drive drivers, especially loss leading drivers, and illegal hunters are leading drivers behind mammal lines.

Freeline

“The driver struck the mountain lion on a stretch of freeway in the San Francisco suburb of San Bruno and sped away, apparently unaware of what happened. … In the dark or low light, it is possible for motorists to fail to see something in the roadway, even with headlights on.” (http://uk.reuters.com/article/2015/01/03/us-usa-california-mountain-lion-idUKKBN0KC01N20150103)

The cat’s eyes appear not to have worked either.